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Why Self-care Matters in Addiction Recovery

When you’re struggling with a substance use disorder, self-care is usually the last thing on your mind. Drugs and alcohol are all you really care about. Everything else--health, relationships, career, money--is sacrificed for substance use. In recovery, there is a lot to fix and you have to start with yourself. Not only do you have to repair your health and relationships, but you have to find a healthier, more sustainable way of living, one that...

How to Help a Loved One Recover from Addiction

It’s terribly frustrating watching a loved one struggle with addiction. Not only is addiction painful for both you and your loved one but the person you love seems to disappear, replaced by someone who only cares about drugs or alcohol. You want to help them but it’s hard to know what to do and most of the time it seems like they don’t even want your help. As frustrating as the situation is, things can...

9 Things to Look for in an Addiction Treatment Program

Choosing an addiction treatment program is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever have to make. Entering treatment for addiction is a major investment in time and money and the outcome will affect your life and your family’s life for years to come. Clearly, it’s a decision you want to get right but it’s also complicated. There are somewhere around 14,000 addiction treatment centers in the US. They vary in size, quality, methods, levels of...

5 Reasons Journaling is Great for Addiction Recovery

Journaling is often used in treatment and many people adopt it as a regular part of their recovery plans. There’s good reason for this. Even just writing a few sentences every evening can have many benefits for mental health and wellbeing and even physical health. Here are some of the reasons you should consider making daily journaling part of your recovery plan. Journaling can help you process difficult emotions. Several studies have found that writing can be...

8 Tips for Making Therapy More Effective

Whether you’re recovering from addiction, an eating disorder, or a mental health issue, psychotherapy will be a central part of your treatment. In therapy, you discover hidden motivations, correct distorted thinking, and develop strategies for healthier behavior. It’s your therapist’s job to help you through the process, so you don’t have to know anything specific before entering therapy. However, there are some things you can do to make sure you’re getting the most out of...

5 Ways to Help a Loved One with Depression

Depression is one of the most common mental health issues in the US. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, around 17.3 million American adults suffered from an episode of major depression in 2017. That’s more than seven percent of all American adults. Depression is even more common among adolescents between ages 12 and 17. About 13 percent of teens suffered an episode of depression in 2017, nearly twice the rate of adults. What’s...

How Do You Know When College Drinking Has Become a Problem?

Drinking has become part of the culture for college students in America. Studies have found that college students drink significantly more than their non-matriculating peers. One national survey found that nearly 60 percent of college students drank alcohol in the past month and two thirds of those reported binge drinking--which is defined as four drinks in a sitting for women and five for men--in the past month. Although we mostly accept college drinking as normal,...

How to Spot a Relapse Before it Happens

Relapse is common in addiction recovery. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, between 40 and 60 percent of people who are treated for addiction will relapse within a year. A relapse has serious consequences. Most overdoses happen after a period of sobriety because people resume using drugs or alcohol at the same levels they are used to but they no longer have the same tolerance. Even if you don’t overdose, relapsing exposes...

9 Signs You May Have an Anxiety Disorder

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health issue in America. More than 19 percent of American adults experienced an anxiety disorder in the past year and more than 30 percent of Americans will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives. Part of the reason anxiety disorders are so common is that the category includes several conditions, such as panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, PTSD, OCD, separation anxiety...

6 Lies Depression Tells You

Depression is one of the most common mental health issues worldwide. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, more than seven percent of American adults--more than 17 million people--suffered an episode of major depression in 2017 and 11 million of those had severe impairment from their symptoms. What’s more, at least a third of people who suffered an episode of major depression got no treatment at all. There are a number of possible reasons...